A 13-year-old from New Orleans was sentenced to 3 years probation after hijacking 5 cars, victims speak out after mayor appears in court to support child

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Carjacking victims are speaking out after a 13-year-old boy was found guilty of hijacking 5 people in two days with a fake gun. His sentence is three years probation. Victims say the whole experience was traumatic. One moment you’re parking in your driveway after leaving work and the next you have a gun pointed at your head. It’s a crime that keeps them in suspense and that’s why they say they want to leave. student. “I am literally held at gunpoint and my abuser gets three years probation and is just released to continue doing the same thing to other people.” Bergeron says she never thought this would happen to her. “I didn’t know what to do,” said Bergeron. “I was terrified, you think at that point your life is going to end. For me, I didn’t know what to do, if I move, will they shoot me?” She says that a boy pointed a gun at her as a group of children took her bag and backpack and drove away with her car, she later found out it was a group of children between the ages of 12 and 14. After they stole Bergeron’s car, that’s when they targeted another woman who says she’s still scared for her life seeing a large gun barrel pointed at my face,” one victim said. “That’s all I could focus on, there was a kid behind the gun yelling, ‘Get the (expletive) out of the car, get the (expletive) out of the car. car. I’m going to shoot you. And I panicked. My first reaction was to just obey because I thought I was going to die.’ But the boys didn’t end there, hijacking a total of five cars in two days. The 13-year-old who had the gun, which authorities learned was fake, was found guilty and sentenced on Thursday to three years probation without jail time. But it’s a sentence that doesn’t fit the two victims in the courtroom as Mayor Latoya Cantrell was there to show his support for the miner who hijacked them. “Sitting on the abuser’s side to console his mother, consoling him, it’s like — it makes you think about what’s going on,” Bergeron said. “It makes you feel really victimized, it makes you think she’s not supporting you because she’s the face of the town.” Judge Ranord Darensbur said the mayor’s support did not influence the decision, saying “my decisions were based on the best interests of the minor and the community, as the youngster participated in eight months of programming and continues to abide by it.” “He’s been through some very important city-administered programs and the Pathways program that reaches out to young people and tries to put them on the right path,” Gregory Joseph said, with the administration of the mayor. “This kid graduated from all levels of the program.” need to change their life. “Is this mayor going to turn his back on this kid and other kids who are making a mistake? Absolutely not,” Joseph said. WDSU asked what the administration would say to victims who don’t feel ” We never lost sight of the trauma these victims felt,” Joseph said. “We never lost sight of that. When she walks into the courtroom, she shows her support not only for the victims, but also for the accused, which is what the mayor is trying to do. Now both women are left on edge. “I can barely leave the house,” Bergeron said. Both women say it is sad to no longer feel safe in a place they have called home. “I feel like it’s only going to get worse so I said we have to leave and until new leaders come in and I can see it’s starting to get better I can feel safer again, then we can come back, but right now we have to escape,” said one of the victims. This year alone, there have been 180 carjackings. That number is already higher than this time last year: 170. The mayor’s administration says it is working with the NOPD to fight crime by working to recruit more officers to the force. was unhappy with the juvenile’s sentencing Sending this statement to WDSU: “In this case, our prosecutors fought and argued for the judge to impose the maximum sentence possible. He was very clear, on the basis of facts, evidence and circumstances, that heavy prison sentences were t necessary to ensure accountability and public safety. We are extremely disappointed with the sentence that was ultimately handed down.

Carjacking victims are speaking out after a 13-year-old boy was found guilty of hijacking 5 people in two days with a fake gun. His sentence is three years probation.

Victims say the whole experience was traumatic. One moment you’re parking in your driveway after leaving work and the next you have a gun pointed at your head. It’s a crime that keeps them on edge and the reason they say they want to leave.

“I don’t want to live in the city anymore where I feel like the city isn’t supporting me,” said law student Madison Bergeron. “I am literally held at gunpoint and my abuser gets three years probation and is just released to continue doing the same thing to other people.”

Bergeron says she never thought this would happen to her.

“I didn’t know what to do,” said Bergeron. “I was terrified, you think at that point your life is going to end. For me, I didn’t know what to do, if I move, will they shoot me?

She says a boy pointed a gun at her as a group of children took her bag and backpack and drove off with her car. Later, she discovered that it was a group of children between the ages of 12 and 14.

After stealing Bergeron’s car, they targeted another woman who says she is still in fear for her life.

“I opened my door all of a sudden, saw a big gun barrel pointed at my face,” one victim said. “That’s all I could focus on, there was a kid behind the gun yelling, ‘Get the (expletive) out of the car, get the (expletive) out of the car. I will shoot you. And I panicked. My first reaction was to just obey because I thought I was going to die.

But the boys didn’t end there, hijacking a total of five cars in two days. The 13-year-old who held the gun, which authorities learned was fake, was found guilty and sentenced on Thursday to three years probation without jail time. But it’s a sentence that doesn’t fit the two victims in the courtroom as Mayor Latoya Cantrell was there to show his support for the miner who hijacked them.

“Sitting on the abuser’s side to console his mother, consoling him, it’s like — it makes you think about what’s going on,” Bergeron said. “It makes you feel really victimized, it makes you think she’s not supporting you because she’s the face of the town.”

Judge Ranord Darensbur said the mayor’s support did not influence the decision, saying “my decisions were based on the best interests of the minor and the community, as the youngster was involved in eight months of programming and continues to comply with”.

“He’s been through some very important programs run by the city and the Pathways program that reaches out to young people and tries to get them on the right track,” said Gregory Joseph, of the mayor’s administration. “This kid graduated from all levels of the program.”

Joseph says Cantrell was there because the mayor is invested in youth programs to help get them out of trouble and give them the support they need to turn their lives around.

“Is this mayor going to turn his back on this child and other children who are wrong? Absolutely not,” Joseph said.

WDSU asked what the administration would say to victims who do not feel supported.

“We never lost sight of the trauma these victims felt,” Joseph said. “We never lost sight of that. When she goes to court, she shows her support not only for the victims, but also for the accused, which is what the mayor is trying to do.

Now the two women are left on edge.

“I can barely leave the house,” Bergeron said.

Both women say it is sad to no longer feel safe in a place they have called home.

“I feel like it’s only going to get worse so I said we have to leave and until new leaders come in and I can see it’s starting to get better I can feel safer again, then we can come back, but for now we have to escape,” said one of the victims.

This year alone, there have been 180 carjackings. That number is already higher than this time last year: 170. The mayor’s administration says it is working with the NOPD to fight crime by working to recruit more officers to the force.

The district attorney’s office was unhappy with the juvenile’s conviction. Sending this statement to WDSU: “In this case, our prosecutors fought hard and argued for the judge to impose the maximum sentence possible. It was very clear, based on the facts, the evidence and the circumstances, that heavy prison sentences were necessary to ensure accountability and public safety. We are extremely disappointed with the sentence that was ultimately handed down.

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